Poached Scrambled Eggs

Ever since Delia Smith’s “How to Cook –  Book One” showed me that I had never really poached an egg in my life I have always used her technique of poaching eggs in a saute pan in a few inches of water.  So, this intrigued me.

I thought it was perfectly smooth and light.  Allan said, when asked what he thought, “It’s hard to say”.  He will never make a food critique or hurt me by saying he would rather have his scrambled eggs whisked in a pan and with butter, another of Delia’s wonderful lessons to me.

Poached Scrambled Eggs

Poached Scrambled Eggs

Poached Scrambled Eggs

http://food52.com/recipes/17328-daniel-patterson-s-poached-scrambled-eggs

  • 4 large eggs
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil (optional)
  • Fine sea salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Crack each egg into a medium-mesh sieve (or narrow-slotted spoon), letting the thin white drain away. Transfer the remaining yolk and white to a small bowl. (Note: If your eggs are very fresh, you can skip this step.)

Beat the eggs vigorously with a fork or whisk for 20 seconds. Set a medium saucepan filled with about 4 inches of water over moderate heat. Put a strainer in the sink. When the water is at a low boil, add a few large pinches of salt, then stir in a clockwise direction to create a whirlpool.

Pour the eggs into the moving water, cover the pot and count to 20. Turn off the heat and uncover the pot. The eggs should be floating on the surface in ribbons.

While holding back the eggs with a spoon, pour off most of the water over the strainer. Gently slide the eggs into the strainer and press them lightly to expel any excess liquid.

Tilt your strainer from side to side to release any trapped water (you can even drain them on paper towels, if you like).

Scoop the eggs into bowls, drizzle with olive oil if desired and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper.

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