My Mom’s Drop Pancakes

On Saturday morning Allan asked for pancakes for breakfast.  This pleased me immensely as I had just got my mom’s drop pancake recipe from her in anticipation of Shrove Tuesday, this coming week.

It was one of her two pancake recipes, the other one is a crepe recipe, which I could rhapsodise about for pages, and will when I post it tomorrow or Tuesday.

I made the batter and put it into the fridge to rest for the required “at least 30 minutes”.

It was twenty four hours later that I actually made the pancakes…

Allan was watching TV in bed when I went to make the batter and was sound asleep when I came back five minutes later.

Bob and I waited patiently for him to wake so we could have the pancakes.  Well, not so patiently, I had a peanut butter chocolate easter egg and Bob chewed on his bone then decided to go back to sleep too.

O_O

Pancakes! I wanted pancakes! And, to make it worse, I wanted these pancakes which I haven’t had in over three years.  Three years is a long time to wait for pancakes!

When Allan did wake up he eschewed pancakes in favour of the Rice Krispie squares calling his name from the kitchen.  So, the pancakes had to wait.

I also have cravings from time to time for some other things from home, most of them trashy, as is my wont, such as Spicy Pot Noodle and Tayto Cheese and Onion crisps, and some of them just regional, like Veda Bread, Soda Bread and Potato Bread.  I have made the potato and soda bread, though I still would love a wee Ormo farl, but Veda is such a protected recipe that there is nothing I can make similar.

Oh, the very thought of hot toasted Veda, dripping with lashings of butter.  My little niece while still only three could eat her way through an entire loaf of the stuff.  Admittedly the loaves are smaller than regular bread, but still… that is impressive stuff from Rosie!

And it has to be butter.  Actually in everything it has to be butter.  I really don’t like the substitutes, butter is natural and if you are trying to be healthier then just have less of it, less often.  But the idea of eating something created in a laboratory instead of natural butter just leaves me cold.

And there is actually butter in these pancakes too, which means they have to be great.

The recipe is my mom’s, she got it from her mom, who probably got it from her mom, all the way back to the day that pancakes were created.  It is, therefore, a well tested recipe.

My grandmother used to make these by the dozen, as did my mom, to freeze and pull out at a moment’s notice.  My Nannie had a metal griddle (I almost typed girdle, which would change the context of this post dramatically!).  I wanted one just like it and was so happy, many years ago, when I managed to find one.

It is in the same storage container as my pasta machine.  We hope to have it all shipped over here this summer.  That will be wonderful, rediscovering all the “treasures” it contains.

These pancakes are not North American pancakes.  They are sweeter and are really delicious eaten cold with butter and, if you are feeling posh, jam.

The recipe quantities make six large pancakes or a dozen smaller ones.  I made a double batch, which made a great breakfast and left six for later.  I could say that I did that just to test how they keep. 

I didn’t.

I know how they keep.  They keep for as long as they are allowed.  Which won’t be long.  Believe me. 

I am really happy to have this recipe.  We call them Drop Pancakes, because the batter is so thick that it drops from the ladle into the pan, but they are also Scotch Pancakes.

It may have been a long wait to have these for breakfast this morning, but it was worth it!

Mom’s Drop Pancakes

8 oz/ 1 cup SR flour (I use AP and add some baking powder)
4 oz/ 1/2 cup sugar
1 egg
½ pint/ 1 cup buttermilk
1 oz/ 2 tbsps melted butter
1 level tsp baking soda

Mix flour and sugar.

Make well and add egg.

Beat well and gradually add milk.

Stand for at least 30 minutes.

Add melted butter and baking soda.

Mix well.

Cook immediately. Flip when bubbles start to burst on surface.

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